Purple flower branch holding a cloth nappie
Cloth nappie with colorful stripes and velcro closure

Cloth nappies

Small nappy that makes a big difference

Product brochure
Q&A
System types
Care and wash

Mamas don't need extra stress that comes with research, so...

If you are new to cloth, we recommend to first read our informative brochure and answer the question Why

Mamas don't need extra stress that comes with research, so...

If you are new to cloth, we recommend to first read our informative brochure and answer the question Why
How many nappies do I need?
How many nappies you need depends on the age of your baby, and how often you would like to do laundry. A newborn baby will go through 8-10 nappies a day, while a toddler will go through 5-6 a day. On average it is recommended to have about 24 nappy changes in your stash. This will allow you to cloth diaper comfortably from newborn to potty training. At the newborn stage, 24 nappies would mean washing every 2nd day, and as the baby grows you can wash every 3 or every 4 days.

It's important to account for washing and drying times, especially during the winter months when drying nappies can take longer.

Using cloth nappies part-time, in combination with disposables, is a great way to try without investing in a full stash right away.
Are all cloth nappies the same?
No, cloth nappies come in a variety of styles to accommodate the individual needs of every family. We recommend trying a few different brands and types, to see which one suits you and your baby. It's generally also a good idea to have a variety of nappies in your stash, to accommodate changing needs and circumstances (such as night time use, daycare, etc.)
Which system resembles disposable diapers?
The All in one (AIO) nappies are the closest in style to disposables since they require no assembly or disassembly. Pocket nappies are a close second, since when stuffed they can be stored and used as just one piece that goes on/off the baby. These nappies are ideal choices for daycares, grandparents, going out, etc.
Which system is most cost effective?
Traditional flat nappies and tri-folds are by far the cheapest. Flats can be folded and secured on the baby with a snappy, while tri-folds can be simply laid inside covers.

The AI2 system is also economical since the covers can be reused multiple times and additional inserts are substantially cheaper than a full nappy.

Pockets and AIO nappies tend to be more expensive, though they are more convenient, less bulky, and easier to use.
Which system is best suited for night time?
This can depend on your baby and how much they pee overnight. Some babies can do fine through the night with their regular nappies. Others however need a more absorbent solution.


Fitted nappies generally work best in this case because they provide absorbency everywhere, and can hold more wee. Similarly, terries (traditional square nappies) can work very well, but they require folding. Both of these options also require a cover. Either a PUL or a wool cover can be used. A wool cover provides additional coverage in case of leaks.


Some AIO nappies are also specifically designed for overnight.
How do wool covers work?
Do you have to purchase additional inserts?
No, all our nappies come with the inserts they need. However, buying extra inserts can be a cost effective way of speeding up your nappy rotation (and therefore needing to buy fewer nappies). Pocket covers dry very quickly, so having extra inserts means you can use the nappy again much sooner. This is particularly efficient in the winter months, when drying can take a while.
Can cloth nappies be used at daycare?
Yes of course. Provide you daycare with enough nappies for the day, and a wetbag where they can store the used ones. To make the experience easier for them, provide one-part systems such as AIO or pockets.
How many nappies do I need?
How many nappies you need depends on the age of your baby, and how often you would like to do laundry. A newborn baby will go through 8-10 nappies a day, while a toddler will go through 5-6 a day. On average it is recommended to have about 24 nappy changes in your stash. This will allow you to cloth diaper comfortably from newborn to potty training. At the newborn stage, 24 nappies would mean washing every 2nd day, and as the baby grows you can wash every 3 or every 4 days.

It's important to account for washing and drying times, especially during the winter months when drying nappies can take longer.

Using cloth nappies part-time, in combination with disposables, is a great way to try without investing in a full stash right away.
Are all cloth nappies the same?
No, cloth nappies come in a variety of styles to accommodate the individual needs of every family. We recommend trying a few different brands and types, to see which one suits you and your baby. It's generally also a good idea to have a variety of nappies in your stash, to accommodate changing needs and circumstances (such as night time use, daycare, etc.)
Which system resembles disposable diapers?
The All in one (AIO) nappies are the closest in style to disposables since they require no assembly or disassembly. Pocket nappies are a close second, since when stuffed they can be stored and used as just one piece that goes on/off the baby. These nappies are ideal choices for daycares, grandparents, going out, etc.
Which system is most cost effective?
Traditional flat nappies and tri-folds are by far the cheapest. Flats can be folded and secured on the baby with a snappy, while tri-folds can be simply laid inside covers.

The AI2 system is also economical since the covers can be reused multiple times and additional inserts are substantially cheaper than a full nappy.

Pockets and AIO nappies tend to be more expensive, though they are more convenient, less bulky, and easier to use.
Which system is best suited for night time?
This can depend on your baby and how much they pee overnight. Some babies can do fine through the night with their regular nappies. Others however need a more absorbent solution.


Fitted nappies generally work best in this case because they provide absorbency everywhere, and can hold more wee. Similarly, terries (traditional square nappies) can work very well, but they require folding. Both of these options also require a cover. Either a PUL or a wool cover can be used. A wool cover provides additional coverage in case of leaks.


Some AIO nappies are also specifically designed for overnight.
How do wool covers work?
Do you have to purchase additional inserts?
No, all our nappies come with the inserts they need. However, buying extra inserts can be a cost effective way of speeding up your nappy rotation (and therefore needing to buy fewer nappies). Pocket covers dry very quickly, so having extra inserts means you can use the nappy again much sooner. This is particularly efficient in the winter months, when drying can take a while.
Can cloth nappies be used at daycare?
Yes of course. Provide you daycare with enough nappies for the day, and a wetbag where they can store the used ones. To make the experience easier for them, provide one-part systems such as AIO or pockets.
Dry pail your prewashed nappies in a different basket until its time for your main wash. A laundry basket with air circulation works well
4.
Main wash you nappies every 1-4 days, depending on how often you need. Wash on a cottons cycle, or a similar length cycle (2.5-3.5 hours), using the amount of detergent listed on packaging for heavily soiled items. Main wash on 40-60 degrees. Other small items may be added into the main wash, such as baby clothes, toddler clothes, t-shirts, shorts (anything smaller than 60x60cm). Machine should be well loaded for ideal agitation - this means loosely full when dry and about 3/4 full when wet (check about 1 hour into your cycle).
5.
Check manufacturer instructions on drying.

*Whenever possible line drying is best for the environment and your nappies
6.
Dry pail untill main wash
Main wash
Dry
Prewash dirty nappies on a short cycle (30-60 minutes) with half dose of detergent. This removed the bulk of the soiling, so nappies can later be washed in clean water. Prewash at 40-60 degrees every 1-2 days (please note, washing on temperature higher than recommended by manufacturer voids warranty).Main wash you nappies every 1-4 days, depending on how often you need. Wash on a cottons cycle, or a similar length cycle (2.5-3.5 hours), using the amount of detergent listed on packaging for heavily soiled items. Main wash on 40-60 degrees. Other small items may be added into the main wash, such as baby clothes, toddler clothes, t-shirts, shorts (anything smaller than 60x60cm). Machine should be well loaded for ideal agitation - this means loosely full when dry and about 3/4 full when wet (check about 1 hour into your cycle).
3.
Prewash
Store dirty nappies in a dry pail (a basket) preferably with holes for plenty of air circulation. This allows water to evaporate from urine and slows down the development of ammonia. A laundry basket works great.
2.
Dry pail dirty nappies
Change baby, and remove any poop into the toilet. Exclusively breastfed poop is water soluble, and doesn't have to be removed. A sprayer is helpful, but not necessary. Poop can be removed in any way you prefer.
Remove soiling
1.
3.
1.
One part system VS two part system
There are two main nappy systems:

The one part system
All the different parts are combined and the nappy goes on the baby as one unit. This includes All in One nappy (AIO), All in Two nappies (Ai2), and pocket nappies

The two-part system
The different parts (the absorbent nappy and the waterproof cover) are not combined and are put on the baby separately, creating a two-step process to the changing of the nappy. This includes fitted nappies, prefolds/trifolds, and terries/flats, all of which require a separate waterproof cover.
All in One (AIO) nappies
All in One (AIO) nappies come in one piece, where all parts of the nappy are already combined. There is no prepping, stuffing, or assembling involved. The absorbency is usually sewn into the cover either completely or partially.

This is one of the most convenient and easy-to-use systems, however, there are some negatives as well. AIO nappies can take a long time to dry due to all the absorbent layers being sewn-in together (partially sewn in absorbency can help with that). They offer less flexibility – while you may add an insert to increase absorbency, you can't take anything out, and you can't interchange the fabrics. AIO nappies also tend to be more expensive.
Pocket nappies
Pocket nappies are just like the AIO when assembled since they look like one single unit. However, the inserts are actually separate and are stuffed into a "pocket". They are then pulled out and washed/dried separately.


This is the most flexible of the one-part systems. The pocket can be stuffed with whichever insert you prefer, or with a combination of inserts for higher absorbency. Most inserts will fit a pocket, so you can interchange brands, fabrics, etc to fit your needs. Most pockets are lined with microfleece or suede cloth, providing a stay-dry layer next to the baby's skin. The pocket keeps the inserts securely inside and prevents them from shifting around.


They do require stuffing which may take some time if you have a lot of nappies to assemble.
All in two (AI2) nappies
The All in two (AI2) nappies are similar to the AIO when assembled, however, the absorbent inserts are not sewn in, instead, they are attached to the cover with a snap or velcro. The inserts are then detached once used and are washed/dried separately. This decreases overall drying time and allows for more flexibility. Inserts can be taken out to decrease absorbency and bulk (when the baby is very small for example), or additional ones can be snapped in to accommodate a growing baby. While AI2 nappies do require some assembly, this system is generally one of the quickest to prep.


The AI2 covers can also be reused multiple times. It's possible to change the insert, attach a clean one, and reuse the nappy again. It's generally recommended to have at least 2 covers and interchange them, so one can air out before being reused. This makes the AI2 system very economical since additional inserts are substantially cheaper than the full nappy.


PLEASE NOTE: Read product descriptions carefully as not all AI2 covers can be reused in a similar way.
Fitted nappies
Fitted nappies are the easiest of the two-part systems because there is no folding required. They are a shaped nappy that looks just like a disposable or an AIO, but the entire nappy is made of absorbent material, making them very reliable. They are, however, not waterproof and require a cover to be put on top.

This is a great overnight system, since it's very absorbent on its own, and can also be easily boosted to last through the night (12+ hours). You can add additional inserts into the fit for boosting when necessary.

Fitted nappies can be a little bulky for daytime, but they are highly recommended for nights, long rides, and very heavy wetting toddlers.
Trifolds
A trifold is a flat square that you can fold three ways, to make an insert. Can be made of various fabrics for targeted absorption, sometimes with a stay-dry panel. A prefold is essentially the same as a trifold, but has additional layers of absorbency in the middle, making it more absorbent than a trifold but also longer to dry.

Both are great inserts, having many absorbent layers when folded, which can unfold for easier washing and faster drying. Can be used in a cover, or inside a pocket.

They can also be folded and put on a newborn with a snappy, for better containment. This provides a good fit on a tinny baby and helps keep all runny poop safely inside. A cover will need to be put on top.
Flats and terries
Flat nappies and terries are larger flat squares, that can be folded in various ways and put on the baby with a snappy. These are the traditional cloth diapers – very absorbent, versatile, and one of the cheapest ways to cloth diaper your baby. They are usually made of cotton, or bamboo terry, and look like a fitted nappy when folded and put on baby. They are simple, have no elastics or closure systems, but work very well and are a great overnight option. Can fit babies from newborn to toddler, and can be folded to provide the most absorbency where it is needed (front or back). They require a waterproof cover on top.
Cover
Waterproof covers, made of PUL or TPU material. They have no absorbency on their own, and are used in combination with an absorbent nappy (in the two part systems). Can also be used with disposable inserts.
One part system VS two part system
There are two main nappy systems:

The one part system
All the different parts are combined and the nappy goes on the baby as one unit. This includes All in One nappy (AIO), All in Two nappies (Ai2), and pocket nappies

The two-part system
The different parts (the absorbent nappy and the waterproof cover) are not combined and are put on the baby separately, creating a two-step process to the changing of the nappy. This includes fitted nappies, prefolds/trifolds, and terries/flats, all of which require a separate waterproof cover.
All in One (AIO) nappies
All in One (AIO) nappies come in one piece, where all parts of the nappy are already combined. There is no prepping, stuffing, or assembling involved. The absorbency is usually sewn into the cover either completely or partially.

This is one of the most convenient and easy-to-use systems, however, there are some negatives as well. AIO nappies can take a long time to dry due to all the absorbent layers being sewn-in together (partially sewn in absorbency can help with that). They offer less flexibility – while you may add an insert to increase absorbency, you can't take anything out, and you can't interchange the fabrics. AIO nappies also tend to be more expensive.
Pocket nappies
Pocket nappies are just like the AIO when assembled since they look like one single unit. However, the inserts are actually separate and are stuffed into a "pocket". They are then pulled out and washed/dried separately.


This is the most flexible of the one-part systems. The pocket can be stuffed with whichever insert you prefer, or with a combination of inserts for higher absorbency. Most inserts will fit a pocket, so you can interchange brands, fabrics, etc to fit your needs. Most pockets are lined with microfleece or suede cloth, providing a stay-dry layer next to the baby's skin. The pocket keeps the inserts securely inside and prevents them from shifting around.


They do require stuffing which may take some time if you have a lot of nappies to assemble.
All in two (AI2) nappies
The All in two (AI2) nappies are similar to the AIO when assembled, however, the absorbent inserts are not sewn in, instead, they are attached to the cover with a snap or velcro. The inserts are then detached once used and are washed/dried separately. This decreases overall drying time and allows for more flexibility. Inserts can be taken out to decrease absorbency and bulk (when the baby is very small for example), or additional ones can be snapped in to accommodate a growing baby. While AI2 nappies do require some assembly, this system is generally one of the quickest to prep.


The AI2 covers can also be reused multiple times. It's possible to change the insert, attach a clean one, and reuse the nappy again. It's generally recommended to have at least 2 covers and interchange them, so one can air out before being reused. This makes the AI2 system very economical since additional inserts are substantially cheaper than the full nappy.


PLEASE NOTE: Read product descriptions carefully as not all AI2 covers can be reused in a similar way.
Fitted nappies
Fitted nappies are the easiest of the two-part systems because there is no folding required. They are a shaped nappy that looks just like a disposable or an AIO, but the entire nappy is made of absorbent material, making them very reliable. They are, however, not waterproof and require a cover to be put on top.

This is a great overnight system, since it's very absorbent on its own, and can also be easily boosted to last through the night (12+ hours). You can add additional inserts into the fit for boosting when necessary.

Fitted nappies can be a little bulky for daytime, but they are highly recommended for nights, long rides, and very heavy wetting toddlers.
Trifolds
A trifold is a flat square that you can fold three ways, to make an insert. Can be made of various fabrics for targeted absorption, sometimes with a stay-dry panel. A prefold is essentially the same as a trifold, but has additional layers of absorbency in the middle, making it more absorbent than a trifold but also longer to dry.

Both are great inserts, having many absorbent layers when folded, which can unfold for easier washing and faster drying. Can be used in a cover, or inside a pocket.

They can also be folded and put on a newborn with a snappy, for better containment. This provides a good fit on a tinny baby and helps keep all runny poop safely inside. A cover will need to be put on top.
Flats and terries
Flat nappies and terries are larger flat squares, that can be folded in various ways and put on the baby with a snappy. These are the traditional cloth diapers – very absorbent, versatile, and one of the cheapest ways to cloth diaper your baby. They are usually made of cotton, or bamboo terry, and look like a fitted nappy when folded and put on baby. They are simple, have no elastics or closure systems, but work very well and are a great overnight option. Can fit babies from newborn to toddler, and can be folded to provide the most absorbency where it is needed (front or back). They require a waterproof cover on top.
Cover
Waterproof covers, made of PUL or TPU material. They have no absorbency on their own, and are used in combination with an absorbent nappy (in the two part systems). Can also be used with disposable inserts.