Cloth pads

Cloth pad in black colour standing in front of another cloth pad with bunny in leafs tuqoise print

Your body, your health, your choice

Product overview
Q&A
Wash and care
Small cartoon star in yellow color
Small cartoon star in yellow color
Small cartoon star in yellow color
Small cartoon star in yellow color

Reusable

Available in all sizes

Zero chemicals

Comfortable and breathable

Liners, day, night and post-partum pads

Only you can choose what is best for your self-care

Using cloth pads versus single-use pads has a huge array of benefits, both personal and environmental.

We recommend to get familiar with this extensive research by Zero Waste Europe investigating impact of single-use personal hygiene care products across Europe
Why cloth pads are better than disposable pads?
Disposable menstrual products often contain a variety of chemicals, a lot of which are placed under the category of fragrances/scents, which are considered a proprietary secret and are therefore undisclosed to the consumer. Synthetic fragrances can be made form a cocktail of up to 3,900 chemicals (styrene, chloromethane, chloroethane, chloroform, acetone, among others). Some of which are identified as carcinogens, neurotoxins, irritants, hormone disruptors and reproductive toxicants. They can also interfere with the balance of good and bad bacteria. This, in combination to lack of breathability, can cause irritations, infections, yeast and thrush in some women.

Cloth pads are a simple cost effective way to avoid these chemicals, since organic or eco-friendly disposable alternatives can be quite costly. Cloth pads are actually cheaper in the long run than all disposable options.
How cloth pads help the environment?
Disposables are essentially comprised of 90% plastic, which takes hundreds of years to decompose. Each individual woman will throw away between 11,000 – 16,000 menstrual products in her lifetime. These also often end up in our waterways and on beaches – sanitary products are the 5th most commonly item found on Europe's beaches (The Guardian, 2019, making cloth pads environmentally friendly option.
Are cloth pads "one size fits all"?
No. They come in a variety of sizes, and materials to accommodate different flows and needs. They also have stay-dry options or more natural fabric feel against the skin (which feels cooler), to suit individual preferences. They have PUL backing (a waterproof fabric) for complete security, or a fleece backing (a water resistant fabric) for higher breathability. Cloth pads are eco-friendly, skin-friendly, and easy to use/care for.
How many pads do I need?
How many pads a woman needs largely depends on her flow, the length of her period, and how often she will be doing laundry. It also depends on whether she will be using cloth pads exclusively, or in combination with a cup. On average she will need the same amount of cloth pads per day as she would disposables. Knowing this number, calculate how many you want to have to account for washing and drying times. If unsure, start using cloth pads part time, in combination with your disposables, until you can figure out a routine that works for you.
Where can I store cloth pads if I have to change while being out?
You can store your used pads in a wet-bag. These bags are made of waterproof material and will contain any smells while keeping your belongings clean.
How do I wash and care for cloth pads?
  1. Simply rinse pads until the water runs clear – this can be done after use, at the end of the day, or whenever you have time. Some women also prefer to do this in the shower. You can use hot or cold water to rinse.
  2. After rinsing, dry pail pads in an airy laundry basket. You can use a wet-bag if you prefer, but bare in mind that having air circulation is better.
  3. Wash your pads with normal laundry, on a long cycle, with good detergent. For best results the washing machine should be well loaded. Do not wash pads with towels, which are very big and can wrap around the pads.
What if my pad gets stained?
If you experience some staining on your pads, you can easily treat them with a quick soak in hot water and Vanish. Do not soak pads for longer than 4 hours (usually, about 10-30 minutes will remove staining). You can reuse pads through your cycle and treat any stained ones afterward. If you experience staining regularly, you can pre-treat your pads after rinsing (before machine washing) by rubbing a bar of soap on the stain or using a stain remover spray (Vanish, Astonish). After treatment wash as usual.
How can I build my stash of pads?
It's a good idea to try different types to figure out what your preferences/needs are, and build your stash accordingly.
Why cloth pads are better than disposable pads?
Disposable menstrual products often contain a variety of chemicals, a lot of which are placed under the category of fragrances/scents, which are considered a proprietary secret and are therefore undisclosed to the consumer. Synthetic fragrances can be made form a cocktail of up to 3,900 chemicals (styrene, chloromethane, chloroethane, chloroform, acetone, among others). Some of which are identified as carcinogens, neurotoxins, irritants, hormone disruptors and reproductive toxicants. They can also interfere with the balance of good and bad bacteria. This, in combination to lack of breathability, can cause irritations, infections, yeast and thrush in some women.

Cloth pads are a simple cost effective way to avoid these chemicals, since organic or eco-friendly disposable alternatives can be quite costly. Cloth pads are actually cheaper in the long run than all disposable options.
How cloth pads help the environment?
Disposables are essentially comprised of 90% plastic, which takes hundreds of years to decompose. Each individual woman will throw away between 11,000 – 16,000 menstrual products in her lifetime. These also often end up in our waterways and on beaches – sanitary products are the 5th most commonly item found on Europe's beaches (The Guardian, 2019, making cloth pads environmentally friendly option.
Are cloth pads "one size fits all"?
No. They come in a variety of sizes, and materials to accommodate different flows and needs. They also have stay-dry options or more natural fabric feel against the skin (which feels cooler), to suit individual preferences. They have PUL backing (a waterproof fabric) for complete security, or a fleece backing (a water resistant fabric) for higher breathability. Cloth pads are eco-friendly, skin-friendly, and easy to use/care for.
How many pads do I need?
How many pads a woman needs largely depends on her flow, the length of her period, and how often she will be doing laundry. It also depends on whether she will be using cloth pads exclusively, or in combination with a cup. On average she will need the same amount of cloth pads per day as she would disposables. Knowing this number, calculate how many you want to have to account for washing and drying times. If unsure, start using cloth pads part time, in combination with your disposables, until you can figure out a routine that works for you.
Where can I store cloth pads if I have to change while being out?
You can store your used pads in a wet-bag. These bags are made of waterproof material and will contain any smells while keeping your belongings clean.
How do I wash and care for cloth pads?
  1. Simply rinse pads until the water runs clear – this can be done after use, at the end of the day, or whenever you have time. Some women also prefer to do this in the shower. You can use hot or cold water to rinse.
  2. After rinsing, dry pail pads in an airy laundry basket. You can use a wet-bag if you prefer, but bare in mind that having air circulation is better.
  3. Wash your pads with normal laundry, on a long cycle, with good detergent. For best results the washing machine should be well loaded. Do not wash pads with towels, which are very big and can wrap around the pads.
What if my pad gets stained?
If you experience some staining on your pads, you can easily treat them with a quick soak in hot water and Vanish. Do not soak pads for longer than 4 hours (usually, about 10-30 minutes will remove staining). You can reuse pads through your cycle and treat any stained ones afterward. If you experience staining regularly, you can pre-treat your pads after rinsing (before machine washing) by rubbing a bar of soap on the stain or using a stain remover spray (Vanish, Astonish). After treatment wash as usual.
How can I build my stash of pads?
It's a good idea to try different types to figure out what your preferences/needs are, and build your stash accordingly.
  1. Simply rinse pads until the water runs clear – this can be done after use, at the end of the day, or whenever you have time. Some women also prefer to do this in the shower. You can use hot or cold water to rinse.
  2. Use a wet-bag to store used pads before rinsing. After rinsing, dry pail pads in an airy laundry basket (wet-bag is ok if you prefer, but having air circulation is better).
  3. Wash your pads with normal laundry, on a long cycle, with good detergent. For best results the washing machine should be well loaded. Do not wash pads with towels, which are very big and can wrap around the pads.
  4. If you experience staining on your pads, you can pre-treat them after rinsing, by rubbing a bar of soap on the stain.
    **If you are using cloth nappies you can add the pads to your nappy prewash and main wash. No need to rinse them then.

    How to wash and care for cloth pads?